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Corporate Finance

M&A Reaches Record Levels: Should You Capitalize on the Current Market’s Opportunities?

The global mergers-and-acquisitions scene has come back in a healthy way, and some might say that the preliminary agreement between Anheuser-Busch InBev and SABMiller is simply the froth on the top of the M&A beer glass. The question on the tips of many CEOs’ tongues, however, is whether these events represent opportunities that won’t last and that they should take advantage of.

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Negotiation Lessons: When CEO Meddling Degrades the Deal

CEOs like to think of themselves as rational beings that apply thorough analysis to get optimal outcomes. Of course, this is not always the case. We’re humans, not optimizing machines.

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Removing the Blinders: 5 Principles for Acquisition Success

While JP Morgan recently predicted that a strong 2014 would lead into a fresh round of M&A activity in 2015, it also noted last year’s level of failed transactions was the highest since 2008.v

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CEOs Move With Caution as a Result of the Fed’s Delay on Interest Rate Increases

While investors may punish markets because the Fed didn’t raise interest rates at its mid-September meeting, many CEOs are completely comfortable with the fact that U.S. Federal Reserve Chairman Janet Yellen and the Fed’s board of governors decided to heed global uncertainties and leave the main borrowing rate near zero for at least a few months longer.

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Companies Are Already Moving to Thwart Effects of the Upcoming ‘Cadillac Tax’

The fate of the “Cadillac tax” in the contract talks between the Detroit Three automakers and the United Auto Workers union that are supposed to be wrapping up this month will cast the highest profile yet on the Obamacare provision that slaps a 40% excise tax on employers that offer the highest-cost health plans.

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Amid Global Market Storms, it’s Critical to Stay Ahead of the Pension Risk Curve

While markets reacted to China’s recent decision to devalue its currency, and as stocks swooned, the Chinese government announced that the nation’s pension funds had been approved to invest in stocks for the first time in history. Such milestones—along with plummeting oil prices and fiscal woes in emerging markets—add layers of complexity to the issues faced by plan sponsors. Now more than ever, it is time for CEOs to have strategic discussions with their CFOs about pension risk management and what steps they should take, not only in the face of market upheaval, but also in light of some new data that adds further dimension.

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