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Financing/Investing/Startups

Stock Buybacks Are Becoming More Popular With CEOs

As CEOs watch the continued economic uncertainty around the globe, many remain hesitant to invest their companies’ cash in building factories, buying new equipment or hiring more workers. So, more of them have been turning to another way to deploy idle financial assets: buying back the company’s own stock.

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The Benefits of Merging With a Startup

Business leaders have used a variety of strategies in recent months to generate cost efficiencies and remain competitive. One that hasn’t gotten as much play, but can be equally as lucrative, is merging with a nimble, entrepreneurially-minded company.

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CEOs, Should You Buy a Sports Team?

Over the past decade, owners who have sold teams saw their val- ues increase by between 7 and 11 percent annually, depending on the league, according to Scott Milleisen, head of JPMorgan Chase’s Private Bank Sports Finance Unit. Much of the growth resulted from richer media-rights agreements in recent years, he adds.

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Four Paths to Unconventional Capital

While crowdsourcing gets all the ink, alternative-financing models also include less sexy BDC (Business Development Company) investment funds, equipment buybacks and other debt and equity strategies ranging from the slightly unconventional to the quirkily obscure. Still, their availability testifies to the buyer’s store of options out there for companies needing cash. Take the BDC option, for instance. This was the ...

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Weighing Your Needs

Traditional financing is tested, tried and true—a financial lifesaver for many companies. But, traditional financing can often be slow to materialize and onerous to obtain—not the best recipe for a business sensing a need to pounce on an opportunity now.

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CEOs Gain Some Confidence in Economy, but Remain Wary

More CEOs and business owners are expressing confidence in U.S. economic growth these days, including decisions to boost capital spending and to lay out more cash to back up their new attitude. But their tea leaves remain muddied because of regular reminders that the American economy is still a long way from the robustness it enjoyed prior to the financial crash of 2008 and its subsequent Great Recession.

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