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Toyota Offers a Lesson in How to Get Back Up After Falling Down

Only five years ago, the Toyota Production System—and the company that spawned it—were the envy of the manufacturing world. Then Toyota buckled, and “TPS” became yesterday’s glory. But now a humbled and wiser Toyota is launching a new, global, “modular” manufacturing system that is meant to re-establish its former pre-eminence in making automobiles. There are lessons other CEOs can learn from Toyota's rise back up from the manufacturing ashes.

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How to Take Advantage of Investors’ Demand for Manufacturing Businesses

2014 marked an incredibly strong year for manufacturing M&A. The sector saw deal value more than double and a 40% jump in deal volume compared to the prior year. The number one destination for private equity investment, the sector inked two dozen mega-deals (those with value of +$1 billion) and activity remained robust into the end of the year even as concerns grew around the fall of energy prices.

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Governors Are Touting Wins of Large-Scale Manufacturing Facilities in Their States

With the U.S. economic recovery in full swing, governors are going head to head to land the next big manufacturing operation and bring thousands of new jobs to their state. A half dozen or so, including Georgia, Alabama, Mississippi, South Carolina, Washington, and of course, Nevada and Texas—already have major wins to report—but with the ink dry, governors have been quick to look toward their next big win, from companies such as Volvo, which is currently in the market for a state in which to hang its manufacturing hat.

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U.S. CEOs Should Review Their China Strategy Amid Governmental, Economic Woes

For decades, the relationship between American companies and China was relatively uncomplicated: The world’s most populous country served as the best base for low-cost manufacturing of goods for the U.S. market and as a rising market for American products ranging from commodities to smartphones and other consumer goods. But this relationship has been changing rapidly, and growing more complex by the day.

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