Home » Talent Management » HR/Employee Strategies

HR/Employee Strategies

3 Creative Workplace Policies that Lure Knowledge Workers

For a long while, it was Silicon Valley companies and tech-oriented startups that lured young digital specialists with perks ranging from in-office massages to ping-pong tables to generous stock options. The Great Recession interrupted much of that, and as the U.S. market for knowledge workers continues to tighten with the slow economic recovery and the digitization of just about everything, companies are getting smarter about the best way to attract and retain these prized employees.

Read More »

How to Turn Employees into Your Best Brand Ambassadors

Now, more than ever, brands are under intense scrutiny, and the need for maintaining trust with customers has never been more acute. But authenticity—which every brand is striving to build— can’t be suddenly acquired. Authenticity is an amalgam of a company’s record, its current activities, its aspirations, and how it treats its customers and society.

Read More »

5 Insights for Making the Most of Your Baby Boomer Employees

As the labor market tightens, it’s natural for business chiefs to focus on attracting and keeping Generation Y, which at once has become both the most numerous population of working Americans and the most influential in many ways. But they also should strive to manage effectively their oldest generation, boomers, who comprised the previous largest generation and whose skills, preferences, strengths and weaknesses largely have shaped the modern economy.

Read More »

Use of Independent Contractors Presents Significant Legal and Business Risks

The benefits to businesses of classifying workers as independent contractors (and not employees) are many: lower taxes, greater freedom from government regulation, exemption from many laws governing the workplace, and potentially lower labor costs. The border between contractors and employees is blurry, however, and businesses must be careful to avoid misclassification, as significant liabilities may arise from getting it wrong: unpaid wages, liquidated damages, back taxes, disqualification of benefit plans, overtime liability, contributions to retirement plans, social security and FICA payments, and even criminal penalties (in rare circumstances).

Read More »