CIOs Need to Stop Being Political and Start Taking Risks

Chief information officers have a big load on their shoulders – the implementation of new technologies can very much affect the bottom line of a company. And because of this, as a whole, the role of CIO has become more political and therefore risk-averse. And as technologies develop at such a rapid rate, companies have a hard time adopting one technology before a better one comes along. Staying risk averse, however, is not going to help your company move forward.

July 22 2011 by ChiefExecutive.net


As technology rapidly expands in the marketplace, executives are increasingly cautious about what and when to implement new technologies and processes.  In the time it takes to adopt one technology, there seems to be another upgrade or replacement for the one you just implemented.  This has caused CIOs to become political and risk-averse; companies are not taking the technological steps that they need to take in order to really innovate and gain market share.

BBC.com interviewed Rado Kotoroc, the chief technology officer for Information builders, about the current technological landscape.  Kotoroc sees that many technology executives afraid to take the first move toward technological innovation; instead executives are looking to existing and proven technologies that have been successful at other companies.  Kotoroc calls this the “me too” strategy.  And by the time you can say “me too,” you’re already behind the curve.

Kotoroc thinks that the future of technology will be in mobility, data analytics, and social networking – all of these have been disruptive technologies that have affected that way that the world does business.  And it’s time for CEOs to work with their CIOs to see how they can effectively implement the technologies that will move their company forward.  You can’t afford to be behind.

Read: Tech decision-makers ‘need to take risks’