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Regulations Really Do Kill Small Businesses: Just Look Here

Every month when Chief Executive polls its CEOs about the future of business conditions, there is a resounding response that government regulations are stifling businesses. Business Insider tackled this exact issue in an article about a regulation from the Environmental Protection Agency requiring businesses take extra precautions around lead paint. No one is arguing that …

Every month when Chief Executive polls its CEOs about the future of business conditions, there is a resounding response that government regulations are stifling businesses.

Business Insider tackled this exact issue in an article about a regulation from the Environmental Protection Agency requiring businesses take extra precautions around lead paint. No one is arguing that lead paint isn’t dangerous, or that it shouldn’t be treated cautiously, but the article paints an interesting portrait of a small business bending over backward to comply with expensive regulations and running itself into the ground.

The costs involved with compliance were too much for the small business to bear, and went under in less than a year.  These regulations favor large companies or companies who choose to illegally disregard protocol.

One CEO who took the right steps and spent money on training and materials was still audited by the EPA. He said, “We are responsible workers and they audited us. Nearly 85 percent of our industry is untrained and the EPA turned their resources on the good guys.  The law is prohibiting me from serving my clients and it is driving my clients to uncertified contractors.”

Are there other regulations that you’ve had to deal with as CEOs that sound like this?

Read: Here’s One Example Of Regulations Killing A Small Business

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