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We Need More Women Leaders, Now What?

Chief Executive Round TableOctober 15th, 2008. WednesdayThe Harvard Club,Manhattan, New YorkAs strategy execution in difficult times has become a top priority, CEOs need to  attract and retain  all available talent, not least their women executives who can be critical assets. A tightening leadership supply in an increasingly complex global market demands it. We invite you to …

Chief Executive Round Table
October 15th, 2008. Wednesday
The Harvard Club,
Manhattan, New York

As strategy execution in difficult times has become a top priority, CEOs need to  attract and retain  all available talent, not least their women executives who can be critical assets. A tightening leadership supply in an increasingly complex global market demands it. We invite you to share your knowledge and ideas on this at our upcoming CEO Roundtable on:  

 We Need More Women Leaders, Now What?

What’s working; What isn’t; How you can do better 

Women hold 50.3 percent of management and professional positions yet represent 15.7 percent of Fortune 500 officers and 1.4 percent of Fortune 500 CEO. Given the need to fully leverage all available talent what are CEOs doing to ensure that their leadership supply is sufficient and comprehensive?  

This roundtable will feature a new, systemic framework that CEOs can use to identify company and individual factors that influence executive women leadership. Based on recent research by RHR International, drawing on actual experiences of 65 senior women across industries (not superficial facts taken at face value), our discussion will address those CEO behaviors that positively and negatively impact the environment in their enterprise to fully leverage their women executives.  

Marilyn Carlson Nelson, Chairman and former CEO [please note Hubert Joly was recently named CEO] of Carlson Companies will be joining the discussion along with several of your CEO peers. When Marilyn first started working as a security analyst her employer asked her to sign her name M.C. Nelson to disguise her identity as a woman. But in running the multi billion-dollar global services company that now employs 200,000 people in 150 countries, she was compelled to attract and retain the best candidates from both genders. As she says, “It’s not only smart, but it makes getting the job done much more interesting.” 

This roundtable will take place on Wednesday, October 15th at The Harvard Club Manhattan. To RSVP or for more details, please contact Betsy Sagges 201-930-5951 or bsagges@chiefexecutive.net.  We know you have much to offer on this topic.

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