#45 Massachusetts


2.24 out of 10 in Taxation and Regulation

6.49 out of 10 in Workforce Quality

5.63 out of 10 in Living Environment

Right to Work?


State Profile

A large majority of companies that chose Massachusetts as a place to expand their business would do it again, primarily based on its innovative economy, industry clusters and skilled workforce, according to “Choosing Massachusetts for Business: Key Factors in Location Decision-Making,” an 18-month study commissioned by MassEcon, the nonpartisan economic development organization, and conducted by the UMass Donahue Institute’s Economic and Public Policy Research group. According to survey respondents, the top three strengths of doing business in Massachusetts were workforce, superior industry clusters and the community environment.

Key Industries

Biotech

Key Companies

BJ’s Wholesale Club
Boston Scientific
EMC Corp.
Global Partners
Raytheon
The TJX Companies
Staples

Key Contacts

Office of Business Development

Annamarie Kersten, EDIP Director
617-973-8534
10 Park Plaza, Suite 3730
Boston, MA 02116
[email protected]
http://www.mass.gov/hed/economic/eohed/bd/

CEO Comments

“Massachusetts lives on life science and financial, but is not generally business friendly.”

Current Developments

2017 Regional Report: Northeast

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