CEO Succession

Need To Find Talent For Succession Planning? Start Building Relationships

The best way to stay competitive, build a better tomorrow and stay ahead of your competition is to have a sustainable, long-term succession plan to maintain leadership.

CEO Succession: The Hidden Costs of Shortcuts

Shortcuts promise an earlier arrival, reduced effort, or less expenditure for a similar outcome. But it's difficult to foresee their risks until they suddenly emerge. Such is the case with CEO succession planning.

Chenault Era Ends At AmEx

American Express chairman and chief executive Kenneth Chenault will step down on Feb. 1 next year after 16 years as CEO, as the company’s board of directors announced it has appointed 32-year AmEx veteran Stephen J. Squeri as its next CEO and chairman.

Upcoming Chevron CEO Will Continue to be Challenged With Lower Oil Prices

If energy company CEOs thought their problems with bottoming oil prices were over, they've got another thing coming.

Sabotaging Your Succession: How CEOs Unwittingly Undermine the Transfer of Power

Simply thinking about your successor aisn’t enough. You need a detailed plan—and you need to be honest with yourself about what comes next.

CEO of GM’s Adam Opel GmbH Division Steps Down

Karl-Thomas Neumann has stepped down as chief executive of GM’s European subsidiary Adam Opel GmbH, and his successor, Michael Lohscheller, will have to grapple with how to turn the money-losing ship around under the helm of Groupe PSA.

Immelt Out, Flannery Next in Line at GE

General Electric CEO and chairman Jeff Immelt today announced he will step down as CEO on Aug. 1, with current president and CEO of GE Healthcare John Flannery set to take the reigns at that time.

Outgoing CEO Shows Rare Display of Humbleness in Demotion

Jeff Cotten admitted he wanted the job, but had nothing but praise for the board.

Ford CEO Out as Investors Show Little Patience for Leaders Seen Falling Behind

Mark Fields will be replaced by the head of the auto giant's autonomous driving unit, according to reports.

For American CEOs Especially, the Path to the Corner Office is a Long One

Heads of large companies are most likely internal appointments who toiled for decades at the same employer to reach the top, survey finds.
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CEO1000

CEO1000 Tracker Full List

From the schools they went to to the types of companies they run, CEO1000 is tracking the trends among the CEOs of the 1,000 largest U.S. companies.

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CEO CONFIDENCE INDEX

CEO Confidence Soars In December, Nears Highest Levels Since 2004

Chief Executive’s monthly survey of CEO confidence finds the economic outlook of America’s corporate leaders nearing its most optimistic since 2003.
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BEST & WORST STATES FOR BUSINESS

Best and Worst States For Business

Are you looking to relocate or expand? Evaluate each state's strengths with Chief Executive's 2017 Best & Worst States for Business.

CEO OF THE YEAR

CEO of the Year

Once a year, we celebrate the achievements of a CEO, honored for his success in and dedication to business, shareholders, customers and employees.

EDITOR'S PICKS

How A Former Accenture CEO Turned A Failing Leadership Into Growth

This former CEO's first year was a disaster until he shifted everyone's focus to create a customer-centric organization. What happened after that went directly to the bottom line.

What P&G Learned About Marketing From Elon Musk

While Tesla was moving ahead of the competition without spending a dime, P&G's marketing machine was watching closely.

How to Follow a Great Leader: Honeywell’s Darius Adamczyk Moves Forward

Darius Adamczyk, Honeywell International’s CEO since April, has a tough act to follow, but his priorities are optimistic and leave him lots of room for stamping his own legacy.

Meet the ‘New-Collar’ Workers in Manufacturing

Modern manufacturing no longer thinks in terms of white or blue collar—the workers it needs now are “new-collar”.