Advanced Manufacturing Hubs Are Growing Across America

Last month, the Bay Area Advanced Manufacturing (BAAM) hub was launched in San Leandro, Calif., comprised of a coalition of San Francisco Bay Area companies engaged in 3D Printing “seeking to make it as easy as possible to go from idea to object … by integrating products, services and solutions into a common, seamless user experience.”

“ BAAM seeks to make it easy to go from idea to object … by integrating products, services and solutions into a common, seamless user experience.”

Espen Sivertsen, chief executive of Type A Machines in San Leandro, took the initiative to create the coalition of non-competing companies looking to connect products and services, and share market insights, technology and partnerships, according to the hub’s new website.

To support BAAM, Type A Machines is building modular hardware and software, providing third-party developers a professional platform for their solutions. Partnering members are quickly following suit, and BAAM now hosts “a thriving startup ecosystem” of 3D scanners, 3D printers, materials, filament recycling, mobile fab labs, modeling services and printing services.

According to the 2013 report, “Remaking Federalism, Renewing the Economy” by the Metropolitan Policy Program at the Brookings Institution, it’s difficult for corporations on their own to sustain applied research initiatives, due to the traditional corporate emphasis on shorter-term rates of return that depress investments in longer-term R&D and innovation.