Author: Julie Ritzer Ross

How Companies Can Avoid Increased OSHA Penalties

Penalties levied by OSHA have never been low: Until recently, a serious first-time violation of OSHA workplace health and safety rules cost companies $7,000 and willful and repeat violations brought penalties of $70,000. But new rules that took effect on August 1 have upped the ante, with penalties now totaling $12,600 for the former and $126,000 for the latter, IndustryWeek reported.

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A Lifetime of Lessons: Morley Safer’s Legacy for Business Leaders

When Morley Safer died in May, many news outlets featured articles about what journalists could learn from the longtime CBS News correspondent. But CEOs can also take a few lessons from Safer, who was a formative presence on the network’s 60 Minutes program for more than four decades and in its newsrooms for many years prior to that.

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The 5 Best—and Worst—Drinks to Order at Business Dinners

Wine is a popular alcoholic beverage of choice for business dinners. However, not every CEO wants to order it at every such event. For those business dinners when you prefer a cocktail over wine, here are the 5 best drinks to order—as well as the 5 cocktails to avoid ordering at all costs, if you want to make a good impression.

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Companies Using Non-GAAP Metrics Should Watch Out for the SEC

Companies that utilize non-GAAP metrics—the “adjusted” financial measures that do not comply with generally accepted accounting principles, or the GAAP standard set of accounting rules followed in the U.S., may need to prepare for closer scrutiny by the Securities and Exchange Commission in the future.

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CEOs and Apologies—Why and How to Say You’re Sorry

From late Apple CEO Steve Jobs and current Apple CEO Tim Cook, to General Motors CEO Mary Barra and BP CEO Tony Hayward, many CEOs have apologized for a myriad of incidents and personal gaffes over the past few years. And while it may not seem the case at first blush, CEO apologies do more than help to save face with shareholders and the public; they benefit companies—and their leaders.

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